Hiring a Junior

Hiring a Junior

Hiring a Junior

“The local market is experiencing a unique shift in the talent landscape : an influx of foreign businesses have chosen Malta as their corporate head office , creating a myriad of opportunities for the local market . How does a company make the most out of their juniors – the talent bracket which is the most difficult to quantify ? Recruitment expert, Francina Moisa, explores a few ways to increase ROI and employer branding in the following article : “
If you’re thinking of hiring a Junior for your team, your’re probably thinking it because of:

 

Commendable Reasons:
  • You reached a natural point in your professional life, where you feel that you want to nurture and grow young talent, share your wisdom and your pain, your findings and mistakes and genuinely wanting to help someone reach their potential
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  • Your business is growing, but you are smart enough to know you need to keep up with the customers of tomorrow : the 17, 18 year olds who in the next 5 years will become buyers of your product. You don’t really get their ways, but you know that in order to thrive as a business, you need to understand them. So you think ahead and get a Junior who will bring you a fresh perspective and grows alongside your future customer base, becoming an ambassador of your brand.
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“Not so nice” Reasons ( being overly polite here )
  • You need someone to fetch your coffee & tea, load the paper in the printer
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  • You enjoy making academics sweat ( you know, the ones with more degrees than you )
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  • You have a budget and you need to spend it
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  • You need to look busy : ” I don’t have time for strategies and budgeting. I HAVE A JUNIOR TO TRAIN! “
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I will only focus on the “commendable reasons” category and share some real life stories that hopefully will help you have assets in your business. The 2nd category is the waste of time part – all you’re doing is wasting someone’s time and your money, it will not get you any results.
  • You reached a natural point in your professional life, where you feel that you want to nurture and grow young talent, share your wisdom and your pain, your findings and mistakes and genuinely wanting to help someone reach their potential
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I was the recipient of this amazing opportunity in my 20’s. My Director was an amazing individual, with fantastic experience in management and top notch commercial sectors. He was genuinely interested in cultivating young talent and offer someone a chance he never had.
Every morning, we would have a walk together and he would tell me about the vision he had for the business: all in very simple words, but he was genuinely interested to make me interested in the business: he would not hide away information from me or try and look though in the face of aversion.
After the walk, we would go into the office and he would draw me a map of where we are now as a business and where we want to be. Then we would bounce ideas to each other that we think will help us reach our goal. No idea was ever laughed at ( even the obviously stupid ones ) and every single idea I had he wrote it down and then he would sit with me and let me explain my reasoning process behind my suggestion. Then, he would take my process and break it down into COST, TIME and VALUE ( CTV ) and we would discuss the implications of CTV at every stage of the process.
In the afternoon, we would take another walk and discuss what needed to be done that’s important – not urgent mind you, but important. And he would let me do it, whilst re-assuring me of his support.
I always felt comfortable going up to him and holding my hands up for any mistakes I made: even when I messed up his accounts so badly, he laughed and sat down with me and showed me how to do the bookkeeping properly.
It was the most valuable help I ever received in my life and to this day, I use everything that he taught me. With every opportunity that I have, I recommend and praise him and still turn to him for advice.
  • Your business is growing, but you are smart enough to know you need to keep up with the customers of tomorrow : the 17, 18 year olds who in the next 5 years will become buyers of your product. You don’t really get their ways, but you know that in order to thrive as a business, you need to understand them. So you think ahead and get a Junior who will bring you a fresh perspective and grows alongside your future customer base, becoming an ambassador of your brand

 

I had the amazing opportunity to help a fantastic Global business recruit juniors for their teams. Prior to my meeting, I was very nervous and full of prejudice: massive business, bums on seats, no prospects, high turnover rate.
After my meeting there, I walked out thinking: ” If only I’d be a Graduate again – I would grab this business and never let go”. It was a pleasure recruiting for them – I was so excited about their brand and I was speaking about them with everyone: my husband even told me at one point to call them up and ask them for a job so would I shut up.

 

So what did this company offer that made me go on and on about them ?

 

1. Commercially aware business
They recognised that the market, since the financial crisis, changed. They weren’t waiting for better times to come along, they worked with the times and made their strategy better. They engaged with their clients and listen to their voice every step of the way: the client wants on line access to their investment accounts? they got it. They wanted to open a bank account in a different jurisdiction? they got it, the company developed external SLA with preferential rates for their clients and so on.
2. Company training
They recognised the existing staff only knew one way of working: pre-crisis. This was post – crisis – so what did they do? Retrain them – new regulations? legislation training. New systems? – IT training. New sales strategy? – trained and so on. From the receptionist to the CEO every single person was re-trained to face the though times by giving them confidence through knowledge. The best confidence one can have.
3. Genuine interest in business
No, I don’t mean making money. Anyone can make money – if you don’t believe me, check out Red Light District’s annual accounts. I mean genuine professional conduct, where the company enjoys solving problems and they take their buzz from knowing that they are the best at what they do. Almost every single person I spoke with in that business had a smile on their face and they were proud to be part of the business.
4. Progression and learning opportunity
Every single new entrant to the business, was assigned a mentor, who would evaluate their progress every 6 months ( thoroughly) : achievement, hurdles, areas of improvement. And this isn’t done so they have an excuse to fire people, no. It’s getting the people involved in the business. If someone had a problem at their valuation, they wouldn’t be fired, but they would be helped to overcome their issues, through training and support.
Every trainee would have an induction plan, on the job training and study support, as well as a healthy starting salary – treating them like professionals. People give up their time for your business – they must be rewarded and respected – this was the ethos of the business.

 

All of this and more created a true sense of purpose and when you have that as a business, you have the potential to create true assets and characters who raise the bar and have a genuine interest in giving you their best.

 

If I was to ask you what will your future Junior get out of working with you, what would you tell me?

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